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Toddlers and their sensory activities
We must allow young children to learn through experience, not just lecture.  These children need to use their senses and be engaged in meaningful experiences.  As we at our centre talk with them about what they are observing and sensing, we give them new language tools to connect with these more familiar sensory tools, building language as well as supporting cognitive concepts specific to the experience. 
 
Sensory play is really part of the scientific process.  Whether out loud or within the internal dialogue of the mind, children have developed a question, leading them to investigate- by grabbing, smelling, listening, rubbing, staring, licking , what have you!  They are using their senses to collect data and from that, attempt to answer their own questions.  Whether or not young children are always able to verbally communicate this process, it is still a valid exercise in scientific inquiry.
 
We  at our centre give a lot of hands on exploration to the kids , It depends on the stage of development. Since play is the tool your child uses to learn about the world, the skills he's working on right now are your biggest clues to choosing the best activities.
For instance, if your 3-month-old is learning how to grab objects, let him play with large soft toys. If at 12 months he's exploring cause and effect, play a simple version of hide-and-seek under tables and chairs.
Here are some guidelines for the types of play your child may be most interested in at different stages, according to Catherine Marchant, a play therapist at Wheelock College in Boston:
 
Social play
Interacting with you and others is important throughout the first year. Infants like to smile, look, and laugh. Older babies enjoy games such as peekaboo and itsy-bitsy spider.
 
Object play
Touching, banging, mouthing, throwing, pushing, and otherwise experimenting with things is fascinating for the 4- to 10-month-old set.
 
Functional and representional play
Pretending to use familiar objects in an appropriate way – pushing a toy lawn mower over the grass, or calling Grandma with a hairbrush, for instance – is the height of fun for 12- to 21-month-olds as their imaginations begin to blossom.
 
Early symbolic play
This type of play, common around the age of 2, creates something out of nothing. Your child might play with a shoebox as if it were a school bus, complete with motor noises, for example, or pretend to eat a plastic ring, insisting it's a doughnut.
 
Role play
Around 30 to 36 months your little actor will begin taking on new roles. Playing doctor, teacher, or mommy is common now.